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Jimmies' Ulland collects 200th victory

University of Jamestown's McKayla Orr (5) guards Sydney Feller, of Concordia (Neb.), during a game earlier this season at Harold Newman Arena. John M. Steiner / The Sun

Greg Ulland didn't just reach the 200th victory of his coaching career Saturday in Sioux City, Iowa; he should've also received a speeding ticket.

The mastermind behind University of Jamestown's current run of success in women's basketball met the impressive feat in just 243 games. For those without a calculator handy, that's a winning percentage of .823.

The Jimmies toppled Morningside College 78-74 in a top 10 showdown to wrap up the Briar Cliff Holiday Classic. The Jimmies and the Mustangs entered the contest tied for sixth in the latest NAIA Division II top 25 coaches' poll.

Ulland, certainly not one to pile on personal praise, credited his athletes—current and former—after victory No. 200.

"All it means is we've had a lot of talented players, and you really can't paint any picture other than that," Ulland said. "Honestly, we've had so many good players come through the program, and they've been the ones out there making the shots, scoring the points and playing for each other.

"I don't do a whole lot when it really comes down to it."

Senior guard McKayla Orr scored a career-high 22 points, converting 9 of 14 from the field and 3 of 5 from 3-point range to lead the Jimmies. But the former Jamestown High School standout arguably shined brighter without the ball in her hands.

Orr helped limit Morningside's honorable mention All-American senior guard Madison Braun to 18 points and three assists. Braun entered the contest having converted 62 3-pointers in 16 games and made 3 of 4 from downtown against the Jimmies.

"(Orr) really asserted herself, just going at their zone and getting to the rim. And, she knocked down a couple big 3s for us throughout the game when we really needed a bucket," Ulland said. "Twenty-two points is great, but defensively she held their All-American in check, who only scored nine or 10 points when she was guarding her. That's what you want to see out of one your senior leaders."

The remainder of the Jimmies' senior backcourt also performed admirably. Bryn Woodside scored 15 points and dished out eight assists, while Paige Emmel hit four treys and also scored 15.

Jamestown shot 51 percent from the field (27 of 52), 52 percent from downtown (11 of 21) and 81 percent from the line (13 of 16). The Jimmies also outrebounded the Mustangs 27-25, with 6-foot junior Jory Mullen posting eight boards.

The Jimmies led 37-34 at the half and withstood a 9-0 Morningside run that cut a 12-point Jimmie advantage to just 68-65 with five minutes left to play. But Jamestown held on for it's 12th victory in a row.

"Today was just another good measuring stick to see where we're at," Ulland said. "By no means did we play perfect, but I thought we played well and it was definitely the type of battle we want at this point in the season."

The Jimmies improved to 16-2 overall and return to conference action Saturday at Bellevue (Neb.). Ulland, now in his eighth season directing the Jimmies, has yet to lead the program to less than 21 victories, or more than eight losses, in a single season.

(6) Jamestown 78, (6) Morningside 74

UJ 18 19 24 17 -- 78

MC 21 13 20 20 -- 74

UJ—McKayla Orr 22, Bryn Woodside 15, Paige Emmel 15, Jenna Doyle 8, Jory Mullen 8, Marina Nowak 7, Allison Jablonsky 3. Totals: 27-53 FG, 13-16 FT, 11-21 3-pointers (Emmel 4, Orr 3, Woodside 3, Jablonsky), 27 Rebounds (Mullen 8), 5 Blocks (Doyle 5), 7 Steals (Woodside 3), 18 Assists (Woodside 8), 14 Fouls, 19 Turnovers.

MC—Madison Braun 18, Sydney Hupp 16, Lauren Lehmkuhl 14, Jordyn Moser 9, Mady Maly 5, Rachelle Housh 5, Jenna Bork 3, Alexandra Gill 2, Sierra Mitchell 2. Totals: 28-57 FG, 9-14 FT, 9-24 3-pointers (Braun 3, Lehmkuhl 2, Moser, Maly, Housh, Bork), 25 Rebounds (Housh 7), 5 Blocks, 10 Steals (Hupp 3), 24 Assists (Moser 8), 16 Fouls, 15 Turnovers.

Records: UJ 16-2. MC 13-4.

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