White mold, Palmer amaranth, cover crops and 60-inch corn are the main topics that will be covered during this year’s field day at the North Dakota State University Oakes Irrigation Research Site -- Robert Titus Research Farm on Thursday, Aug. 15.

The free event begins with refreshments at 8:30 a.m. with the program 9 a.m. to noon. Lunch will follow the last presentation. No preregistration is required.

Michael Wunsch, plant pathologist at NDSU’s Carrington Research Extension Center, will share his research in ways to more effectively control disease in soybeans, dry beans and sunflowers. Much of his work has been done at the Oakes research site.

Wunsch will discuss his studies, providing producers, consultants and the agricultural industry with insights into how to effectively manage and prevent white mold from robbing yields and profits.

NDSU Extension cropping systems specialist Greg Endres will talk about where Palmer amaranth has been found in North Dakota and how to deal with this aggressive weed.

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The research site has many potato trials, including variety trials. NDSU potato representatives will talk about their work at the Oakes site and across the state.

Cover crops are of major interest this year, with thousands of prevented plant acres, and 60-inch corn is on the soil conservation radar because it allows for better development of an interseeded cover crop.

In early on-farm trials, 60-inch corn has not reduced yields if weed control is maintained and has added soil health and grazing benefits. Kelly Cooper, research agronomist at the Oakes site; Seth Nelson, research specialist at the site; and Matt Olson, Wild Rice Soil Conservation District representative, will talk about cover crops in general and 60-inch corn’s potential applications. Field day attendees will be able to tour the site’s 60-inch corn plots, and the irrigated corn hybrid and soybean performance tests.

The 40-acre site, which is 4.5 miles south of Oakes on North Dakota Highway 1, is a substation of the NDSU Carrington Research Extension Center.

For more information, contact the CREC at 701-652-2951 or visit https://www.ag.ndsu.edu/CarringtonREC.