SUBSCRIBE NOW Just 99¢ for your first month

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Tobin joins North Dakota State University's Carrington Research Extension Center

Colin Tobin earned his Bachelor of Science in agriculture and Master of Science in plant science from South Dakota State University and earned his doctorate in range science from New Mexico State University.

Colin Tobin
Colin Tobin Contributed/North Dakota State University Extension Service
We are part of The Trust Project.

Colin Tobin has joined North Dakota State University’s Carrington Research Extension Center as an animal scientist.

Tobin’s research will focus on backgrounding and feedlot nutrition utilizing alternative feed resources, as well as integrating multiple enterprises to help improve the productivity and resilience of livestock farmers and ranchers.

“Growing up on a farm and ranch in South Dakota planted the seed for me to think like a farmer or rancher,” Tobin said. “My graduate research revolved around how to improve livestock production while ensuring quality of life for those animals, and this opportunity at the CREC will allow that seed to grow.”

Tobin earned his Bachelor of Science in agriculture and Master of Science in plant science from South Dakota State University and earned his doctorate in range science from New Mexico State University. His master’s research focused on multiple aspects of integrated crop-livestock systems, while his doctoral research evaluated grazing distribution and animal care using multiple tracking devices in central Arizona.

“We are extremely happy to have Colin join the NDSU Carrington Research Extension Center,” said Mike Ostlie, CREC assistant director and research agronomist. “His family-farm background and great training from South Dakota and New Mexico are an immediate asset to our region.”

ADVERTISEMENT

Tobin is from Wessington Springs, South Dakota.

Related Topics: AGRICULTURE
What to read next
Underwood, who is also a three-time ACM Entertainer of the Year, will be joined by special guest Jimmie Allen.
Quaal Dairy in Otter Tail County sold off most of its herd in April. Vernon Quaal says the 2021 drought drastically cut into its feed supply and the rising prices for feed made maintaining the 300 cow herd unstainable. Quaal says many dairies are suffering. But he is determined to build back up, with a crop of bred heifers ready to calve in September.
Anne Waltner, Parker, South Dakota, left a full-time career as a concert pianist and educator to join her parents’ farming operation. Along the way she married, had triplet daughters and survived cancer. Of her journey and life, she says: “Can you think of anybody luckier than me?”
One hundred employers representing a variety of industries are expected to participate.