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U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

Latest Headlines
Previous policy limited only birds from avian influenza hotspots.
A $1 million appropriation came through funding for USDA ARS to enter into cooperative agreements with universities and outside organizations, including Grand Farm, that are focused on precision agriculture research.
The Conservation Stewardship Program, delivered by the Natural Resources Conservation Service, is highly popular with farmland owners in North Dakota as a way to increase environmentally-friendly practices. Todd C. Hagel, assistant state conservation, describes the basics in the rules.
The U.S. Department of Agriculture on Wednesday, July 20, 2022, changed the formula for disaster payments for above-normal livestock losses to reflect truer values of baby calves and other animals, in the wake of the April 2022 “Blizzard Haley” storm complex that hit North Dakota. The previous administration had administratively in 2020 added a "bottom-tier" of payment for baby calves that undervalued the animals.
Stories from the previous week that appeared on www.jamestownsun.com and in The Jamestown Sun.
Xochitil Torres Small, the USDA’s under secretary for Rural Development, and Sen. John Hoeven, R-N.D., met with Farmers Union members and area processors Monday, June 27.

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This investment is in addition to the more than $33 million announced earlier this year.
Rural health care officials spoke about the challenges Monday, June 27, during a roundtable discussion that included Xochitl Torres Small, U.S. Department of Agriculture’s under secretary for Rural Development; Sen. John Hoeven, R-N.D.; and Erin Oban, North Dakota’s USDA state director of Rural Development.
A series of April blizzards created a “long tail” of cattle illnesses, including pneumonia and scours. Losses range from zero to hundreds of calves, on top of record-setting drought and low feed and forage supplies. The numbers hide some of the effects — the loss in value when either a calf or a cow is lost, leaving orphans. 

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