Jenny Schlecht

Jenny Schlecht

Editor

Jenny Schlecht is Agweek's editor. She lives with her husband and two daughters on a farm and ranch in Medina, North Dakota — a perfect vantage point for writing agriculture and rural news.

Jenny grew up on a farm and ranch outside Billings, Montana. She graduated from the University of Mary with a bachelor's degree in communications and a minor in psychology. She previously worked as a police and courts reporter and assistant city editor at the Bismarck (N.D.) Tribune.
Jenny can be reached at jschlecht@agweek.com or 701-595-0425.

An oilseed processing plant in Enderlin has been at least partially shut down for a week after employees noticed a meal tank had shifted on its foundation.
Why did we report on a Bill Gates-associated company buying North Dakota farmland from Campbell Farms? Here are three reasons.
The ceremony for the Green Bison Soy Processing facility in Spiritwood, North Dakota, was held earlier this month.
Jenny Schlecht describes how two calves on her farm needed milk replacer to stay alive.
"Last year at this time, when we already were watching the U.S. Drought Monitor turn redder and redder every week, we would have danced with joy to see even one of the storms we've had this year. But right now, at this minute, can it please stop?"
Losing the bank in town seemed like it could be the beginning of the end for the community. Instead, it revealed that there are still some business leaders who believe in small towns.
"I think this one could have been way worse, for a number of reasons."
A series of storms brought around 4 feet of snow to some parts of the region. While the storm and its aftermath continue to stress ranchers and cattle, there is optimism that it spells the beginning of the end of a dry cycle.
"When it comes down to it, all planting right now feels very 'prospective.' Something will go into the ground, but we don't know when and we don't completely know what. We're at the mercy of the weather, and we know well enough that we don't know what that will look like."
The HPAI case in Kidder County is North Dakota's first since 2015.