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Astro Bob

The five bright planets will still shine at dawn for the next week or two, but Monday morning, June 27, will be our last chance to see the moon in the lineup.
There are more than five planets at dawn. Hidden in the lineup are Uranus, Neptune and the asteroid Vesta. Oh, and Earth, too.
As we celebrate the new season a brightening comet beckons.
Silky and blue, clouds made of meteor dust glow at the edge of outer space.

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This remarkable planet parade won't happen again until 2041.
Tuesday night's full moon reminds us it's strawberry season. There's also a chance for auroras the next few nights.
On Sunday evening, June 12, the gibbous moon will almost touch the star Dschubba in the Scorpion. For some observers, it will disappear altogether.
Grab your binoculars for a look at these six attractive double stars all located near the bright star Vega.
Sitting almost directly below the Pole Star this month, Cassiopeia really does look like a W. We explore its wonders.
A striking crater triplet and massive fault highlight the crescent moon Sunday night, June 5. In addition, the moon will pass very close to the star Eta Leonis, hiding it from view in some locations.

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A handy summary of the month's finest, naked-eye sky sights and events.
No one was sure what to expect. While we didn't see a "meteor storm," observers with dark skies got a nice show.
Dust from the breakup of comet 73P in 1995 may spawn a brief but rich meteor shower late Monday night, May 30.

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