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Carrington lime waste landfill has 75-year plan

The city of Carrington has invested approximately $400,000 in a landfill project to protect groundwater resources from contamination. For decades the city water treatment plant stored a sludge material that was produced as a byproduct of lime wat...

  

 

The city of Carrington has invested approximately $400,000 in a landfill project to protect groundwater resources from contamination.

For decades the city water treatment plant stored a sludge material that was produced as a byproduct of lime water softening adjacent to the facility, said Mitchell Otten, superintendent of the public works department in Carrington. Farmers would come and haul the lime away for use as a soil additive.

That is less a preferred method in the present and the facility was running out of space for the lime pile, he said. The North Dakota Department of Health recommended that the lime be disposed of properly, he said.

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“The solution was to engage with Interstate Engineering in building a landfill,” Otten said. “The city has none and there was a rigorous search process for a suitable parcel of land.”

The City Council approved a landfill search in January 2016. Wade Senger, the landfill project engineer with Interstate Engineering, conducted the search. He recommended around 27 acres of ag land just a few miles northwest of the city to use as the landfill.

Jennifer Gast, Carrington city auditor, said the city approved $60,000 from the city water fund that was used to purchase the former haying land in mid-2016.

Senger said environmental factors included aquifer location, soil type and topography.

“This plan to develop future cells on the land is the long-term solution for the city,” Senger said.

Work started in the fall on a clay-lined 5-acre hole to store sludge and isolate groundwater. The firstphase hole is expected to fill within 20 years when a second phase hole will be completed, with a fivephase process continuing over 70 years, Otten said. Construction was about 50 percent complete with some lime already hauled to the hole prior to winter, he said.

“We anticipate the first phase cell to be complete in June or July,” Otten said.

The construction and operation of the landfill will not create additional jobs with the city, Otten said. The present wastewater treatment and city works crews will operate and maintain the landfill, he said.

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Talha Nafie, a project engineer with the state Department of Health, said the landfill design required input from other agencies including the Department of Agriculture and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. There were no issues with project and the Waste Management division of the state Department of Health permitted the construction and operation of the landfill.

The City Council has discretion to allow other permitted items in the landfill, Otten said. That decision will consider that other materials will reduce the lifespan of the landfill, he said.

Carrington Mayor Neil Fandrich and the City Council applied for a Clean Water State Revolving Fund loan through the state Department Health. The $339,000 award in January comes from the Environmental Protection Agency as a 20-year low-interest loan for the landfill project authorized under the Clean Water Act.

“Our Clean Water SRF program is available for these types of projects and other wastewater projects along with sanitation and sewer placement and water waste projects,” said Dave Bergsagel, program manager with the Environmental Health Section of the North Dakota Department of Health. “Right now the interest rates are very low at 2 percent for loans.”

tlaventure@jamestownsun.com

(701) 952-8455

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