SIOUX FALLS, S.D. — South Dakota officials say they'll provide an update on Tuesday, Oct. 13, on the investigation into the auto collision by Attorney General Jason Ravnsborg that killed Joe Boever near Highmore last month.

Gov. Kristi Noem and Department of Public Safety Secretary Craig Price will provide the update in a news conference at Sioux Falls City Hall, the governor's office announced late Monday morning, Oct. 12. No additional details were provided.

Boever, of Highmore, was struck and killed just west of his hometown about 10:30 p.m. Sept. 12 by Ravnsborg, who has said he was returning to Pierre via U.S. Highway 14 after attending a GOP dinner in Redfield earlier that day.

Noem and Price held a news conference the following day to say Ravnsborg had been involved in a collision, although they offered few additional details.

Ravnsborg later released a statement admitting to accidentally striking and killing Boever with his car, although he also said he thought he had hit a deer and didn't see a body when he stopped to search. Ravnsborg said he had discovered Boever's body the next morning after coming back to the scene prior to returning a borrowed car to the local county sheriff.

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Price and Noem have previously refused to share many additional details about the investigation, and refrained from releasing the audio recording of the 911 call Ravnsborg said he made the night of the collision with Boever.

Brothers Nick and Victor Nemec look over the site where South Dakota Attorney General Jason Ravnsborg struck and killed their cousin, Joe Boever, with his car the night of Sept. 12 on U.S. Highway 14 just west of Highmore, South Dakota. Jeremy Fugleberg / Forum News Service
Brothers Nick and Victor Nemec look over the site where South Dakota Attorney General Jason Ravnsborg struck and killed their cousin, Joe Boever, with his car the night of Sept. 12 on U.S. Highway 14 just west of Highmore, South Dakota. Jeremy Fugleberg / Forum News Service

Fatal auto crash investigations usually take about 30 days to complete, Department of Public Safety spokesman Tony Mangan said last week, when contacted by Forum News Service for an update on the Ravnsborg investigation. Tuesday would be 31 days since the night of the crash.

While Price, head of DPS, is overseeing the investigation, the North Dakota Bureau of Criminal Investigation assisted the South Dakota Highway Patrol with the investigation since the equivalent investigative agency in South Dakota reports directly to Ravnsborg.

Ravnsborg, who is not appointed by Noem but is statewide officer directly elected by voters, has continued to perform his duties as the investigation continues.

Fugleberg can be followed on Twitter at @jayfug and reached at jfugleberg@forumcomm.com or 605-777-3357.