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Jamestown man sentenced on felony burglary charges

A Class B felony is punishable by 10 years in prison and a $20,000 fine.

Stanford Lamar Williams
Stanford Lamar Williams
Contributed / Stutsman County Correctional Center
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JAMESTOWN – A 31-year-old Jamestown man who was arrested after a months-long investigation of a string of burglaries at an apartment complex has been sentenced.

Stanford Lamar Williams Jr. pleaded guilty to four counts of burglary, Class B felonies.

Williams was accused of entering apartment units without permission or authorization to commit theft from July 10 through Sept. 23.

Judge Cherie Clark sentenced Williams Jr. to 13 months in the North Dakota Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation with credit for 55 days served. Clark placed Williams Jr. on 18 months supervised probation and ordered him to complete a diagnostic assessment for chemical and mental health within 90 days of his release and complete recommended treatment within 120 days of his release. The diagnostic assessment can be completed while incarcerated if it is available. Clark also ordered Williams Jr. to pay a $35 indigent defense application fee and $770 in restitution.

Williams was also ordered to not come within 300 yards of 714 13th St. SE.

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A Class B felony is punishable by 10 years in prison and a $20,000 fine.

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