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Investigators release new details in Rachel Anthony cold case

The Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension and Cass County Sheriff’s Office said the cigarettes and malt liquor made up the last transaction of the night on Feb. 27, 2001, at Ultimate Liquors on Barclay Avenue in Pine River, Minnesota.

Rachel Anthony
Rachel Anthony
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PINE RIVER, Minn. — Rachel Anthony’s killer may have smoked Kool cigarettes and drank Mickey’s malt liquor.

Investigators are hoping these details, released to the public for the first time Friday, Feb. 25, might spark people’s memories and lead to solving the cold case of the abduction and murder of 50-year-old Anthony 21 years ago.

The Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension and Cass County Sheriff’s Office said the cigarettes and malt liquor made up the last transaction of the night on Feb. 27, 2001, at Ultimate Liquors on Barclay Avenue in Pine River.

Rachel Anthony
Rachel Anthony

Those involved with the case have long suspected the person who prompted Anthony, an employee of the liquor store, to ring up the items is likely the same person responsible for her death. Both brands are somewhat out of the ordinary and investigators believe the killer likely either had family ties to the area or lived here at the time.

“If someone has information, even if it's the smallest detail, please report it as this little detail could make a difference,” Cass County Sheriff Tom Burch stated in a news release. “The Cass County Sheriff’s Office and BCA are committed to following up on all leads and hope that one will bring us to the successful outcome of this tragic case.”

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“We hope that this new detail may jog someone’s memory and we encourage them to come forward,” stated BCA Superintendent Drew Evans. “Rachel’s family deserves answers, and the person who killed her deserves justice.”

Help solve Anthony’s case

The case remains an open investigation with the BCA and the Cass County Sheriff's Office. Spotlight on Crime is offering up to $50,000 for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the person or people responsible for Rachel Anthony’s murder.

If anyone knows anything about the case — even if it seems to be a small, inconsequential detail — they are asked to contact the BCA at bca.tips@state.mn.us or 877-996-6222, or Cass County at 218-547-1424 or 800-450-2677.

The crime

It’s been two decades since the bitterly cold night when Anthony disappeared, never to be seen alive again.

Sunday, Feb. 27, marks the 21st anniversary of the woman vanishing, only for her lifeless, strangled body to be found six weeks later at the bottom of a roadside embankment 10 miles away near Breezy Point.

More stories on Rachel Anthony

Anthony, a tall woman with striking blue eyes who seemed well-liked and was described as a hard worker with a magnetic personality by her former employer, often closed down the store. For a year and a half, Anthony worked the night shift alone after spending the day with her young grandsons at the rural Pequot Lakes home she shared with daughter Jessica Anthony and her former son-in-law. That Tuesday night, she’d already started her Ford Escort in preparation for her drive home while winding things down for closing time.

Later, Jessica Anthony would tell police her mother usually followed a routine: exiting through the front door to start her car, returning through that same door and locking it behind her, taking the garbage out to the dumpster in the back, locking the back door behind her and leaving for the last time out the front.

This routine, it appeared to police, was interrupted that night. Sometime between midnight and 1 a.m. Feb. 28, 2001, a Pine River police officer began to wonder about the parked car puffing exhaust outside the still-lit liquor store as he drove along Barclay Avenue, the main street through the heart of the small Cass County city. He stopped to investigate, finding the front door locked. The back door in the alley, however, swung open when the officer pulled the handle. Nothing looked amiss and no one was inside, but Anthony’s coat, purse and cigarettes remained.

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Investigators looked at who was traveling along Highway 371 that night, looked at receipts from the liquor store and the type of alcohol purchased. All those who made purchases from the liquor store during her shift were cooperative and eliminated as suspects.

The last purchase rung up by Anthony that night occurred at 9:56 p.m., but the transaction was never completed.

While investigators and agents looked for clues, extensive searches were ongoing in Pine River and the surrounding area by air and land to find Anthony. Neighborhoods were canvassed, but there were still no signs of Anthony.

Tips poured in to police in the beginning, though none yielded information on Anthony’s whereabouts. There was no sign of her anywhere until April 14, 2001, when four teenagers on horseback made a gruesome discovery on a road between Breezy Point and Pequot Lakes.

The red circle denotes the approximate area where Rachel Anthony's body was found six weeks after she disappeared in February 2001 from Ultimate Liquors in Pine River. Source / Google Maps
The red circle denotes the approximate area where Rachel Anthony's body was found six weeks after she disappeared in February 2001 from Ultimate Liquors in Pine River.
Source / Google Maps

Spanning 1 mile, Nelson Road runs north-south and connects Buschmann and Wild Acre roads. Wooded and hilly, the street is sparsely dotted with homes along with a large gravel pit, known locally as the Swenson pit. Across the street, southeast of the pit’s entrance, Anthony’s body lay about 15 feet down an embankment giving way to a wetland.

After the discovery of Anthony’s body, an autopsy of which revealed she died of asphyxia due to homicidal violence, investigators tried to determine who was responsible. Theories vary on who killed Anthony and why, and with no major suspects ever identified, the debate continues.

This story will be updated. Check back at BrainerdDispatch.com.

CHELSEY PERKINS, community editor, may be reached at 218-855-5874 or chelsey.perkins@brainerddispatch.com . Follow on Twitter at twitter.com/DispatchChelsey .

Chelsey Perkins is the community editor of the Brainerd Dispatch. A lakes area native, Perkins joined the Dispatch staff in 2014. She is the Crow Wing County government beat reporter and the producer and primary host of the "Brainerd Dispatch Minute" podcast.
Reach her at chelsey.perkins@brainerddispatch.com or at 218-855-5874 and find @DispatchChelsey on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.
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