We see that you have javascript disabled. Please enable javascript and refresh the page to continue reading local news. If you feel you have received this message in error, please contact the customer support team at 1-833-248-7801.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Derek Chauvin expected to change plea to guilty in George Floyd civil rights case

The U.S. District Court in Saint Paul announced the change-of-plea hearing on Monday, an indication Chauvin, 45, would change his plea to guilty.

Derek Chauvin booking photo, April 20, 2021. (Photo courtesy Minnesota Department of Corrections)
Derek Chauvin booking photo, April 20, 2021.
Minnesota Department of Corrections
We are part of The Trust Project.

Dec 15 (Reuters) - White former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin is expected to plead guilty on Wednesday in a federal court in Minnesota to charges that he violated George Floyd's civil rights during the Black man's murder, reversing his not-guilty plea in September.

The U.S. District Court in Saint Paul announced the change-of-plea hearing on Monday, an indication Chauvin, 45, would change his plea to guilty. Chauvin's lawyer Eric Nelson did not respond to a request for comment on Tuesday.

The charges carry a maximum penalty of life imprisonment or death, depending on the circumstances of the crime and the resulting injury. Prosecutors have not indicated any intent to seek the death penalty.

Chauvin has already been sentenced to 22-1/2 years in prison in state court for the 2020 murder of Floyd, on whose neck the then-policeman knelt for nearly nine minutes while a bystander captured it on her cellphone.

His April conviction in state court, on charges of unintentional second-degree murder, third-degree murder and manslaughter, was seen by many as a landmark rebuke of the disproportionate use of police force against Black Americans.

ADVERTISEMENT

The video showed Chauvin kneeling on the neck of the handcuffed Floyd for more than nine minutes during the arrest caused global outrage -- and triggered one of the biggest protest movements in the United States in decades.

Chauvin and three other officers -- Thomas Lane, J. Alexander Kueng and Tou Thao -- were arresting Floyd on suspicion of using a fake $20 bill. Lane, Kueng, and Thao face charges in a state trial due to begin in March that they aided and abetted the killing of Floyd.

In addition to the state charges, all four officers were federally indicted in May on charges of depriving Floyd of his civil rights by failing to provide him with medical attention.

Chauvin also was federally charged with violating Floyd's right to be free from unreasonable seizure and unreasonable force by a police officer. Thao and Kueng were federally charged with violating Floyd's right to be free from unreasonable seizure by not intervening to stop Chauvin from kneeling on Floyd's neck.

Chauvin has also pleaded not guilty to federal charges of violating the civil rights of a 14-year-old boy he arrested in 2017.

(Reporting by Julia Harte; editing by Jonathan Oatis.)

What to read next
Some 79% of customers, or 414,000, were without power in Nova Scotia, and 95%, or 82,000, had lost power on Prince Edward Island, utility companies said.
As of Thursday afternoon, Fiona had maximum sustained winds of 130 miles per hour and was about 345 miles west-southwest of Bermuda and moving north-northeast at 16 mph, the National Hurricane Center in Miami said.
The bill passed the House in a vote of 229-203, with most Republicans in opposition. It will need to resolve differences with a similar Senate bill before it can head to Biden to sign.
Breaking News
Trump on Aug. 10 declined to answer questions in a lengthy, closed-door deposition at the office of the attorney general, invoking his constitutional right against self-incrimination more than 400 times.