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Addiction treatment providers bordering North Dakota can access state's voucher program

Before applying to participate in the voucher program, interested out-of-state addiction treatment providers must submit an assessment of need identifying current barriers for North Dakotans to access addiction treatment and how they plan to reduce the barriers.

FSA North Dakota news brief
North Dakota news brief
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BISMARCK — Starting, Friday, July 1, licensed addiction treatment providers in states bordering North Dakota can access the state’s Substance Use Disorder Voucher program, according to the North Dakota Department of Human Services.

The change will allow North Dakotans who live in underserved areas the ability to access vital treatment services closer to their homes, according to NDDHS officials.

Before applying to participate in the voucher program, interested out-of-state addiction treatment providers must submit an assessment of need identifying current barriers for North Dakotans to access addiction treatment and how they plan to reduce the barriers.

Providers offering person-centered outpatient services and who are in good standing with their respective state’s licensing agency will be considered.

The voucher program was implemented in 2016 to support eligible people in their personal recovery by reducing financial barriers in accessing addiction treatment and recovery services. It provides reimbursement for services such as screenings, evaluations, individual or group therapy, transportation and peer support.

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During the 2021 legislative session, North Dakota lawmakers passed House Bill 1402 authorizing out-of-state providers the option to access the SUD Voucher program.

For details on becoming a participating SUD Voucher program provider, visit www.behavioralhealth.nd.gov/sudvoucher/provider-guidance or contact the division at 701-328-8920, toll-free 800-755-2719, 711 (TTY) or sudvoucher@nd.gov .

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