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South Dakota man killed in one-vehicle crash Wednesday in west-central Minnesota

According to a crash report, Daniel Lee Basler Jr., 36, of Webster, South Dakota, was driving a 2014 freight tractor eastbound on state Highway 40 in Louriston Township when the vehicle left the roadway near 70th Avenue Northeast, entered the south ditch and rolled.

FSA Fatal crash accident
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KERKHOVEN, Minnesota — A South Dakota man died following a one-vehicle crash late Wednesday night, July 28, in Chippewa County, according to the Minnesota State Patrol.

According to the crash report, Daniel Lee Basler Jr., 36, of Webster, South Dakota, was driving a 2014 freight tractor eastbound on Minnesota Highway 40 in Louriston Township where the vehicle left the roadway near 70th Avenue Northeast, entered the south ditch and rolled.

Basler was transported to the CentraCare St. Cloud Hospital, and his injuries were fatal.

Basler was not wearing a seat belt, his airbag did not deploy and alcohol was not involved, according to the State Patrol. Road conditions were dry.

The Boondock Fire Department and EMS, Kerkhoven Fire Department and EMS, Chippewa County Sheriff's Office, Swift County Sheriff's Office and Clara City Police Department responded to the incident reported at 11:51 p.m. Wednesday.

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