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Supply deliveries to protest camp could be fined

BISMARCK - Vehicles delivering supplies to the Dakota Access Protest camp could be subject to a $1,000 fine per the governor's emergency evacuation order, a state official said Tuesday.

The Oceti Sakowin camp is seen Monday in a snow storm during a protest against plans to pass the Dakota Access pipeline near the Standing Rock Indian Reservation, near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Photo by Reuters
The Oceti Sakowin camp is seen Monday in a snow storm during a protest against plans to pass the Dakota Access pipeline near the Standing Rock Indian Reservation, near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Photo by Reuters

BISMARCK – Vehicles delivering supplies to the Dakota Access Protest camp could be subject to a $1,000 fine per the governor’s emergency evacuation order, a state official said Tuesday.

Cecily Fong, spokeswoman for the Department of Emergency Services, said law enforcement can stop vehicles in the area of the protest camp in southern Morton County and issue a $1,000 fine if the motorists are delivering supplies to the area under the evacuation order.

Fong said there will be “passive enforcement” of the rule, meaning officers won’t actively be enforcing the restriction but may stop vehicles if they encounter them during their patrols.

Gov. Jack Dalrymple ordered an emergency evacuation of the main protest camp north of the Cannonball River on Monday, citing harsh winter weather.

The $1,000 fine will not apply to land on the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation, but it could be enforced on Highway 6, the route many motorists take due to the Highway 1806 road closure, Fong said.

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No fines had been issued as of early Tuesday afternoon, Fong said.

Law enforcement has already been blocking traffic north of the camp on Highway 1806 at Fort Rice for several weeks. The Backwater Bridge on Highway 1806 just north of the main camp has remained closed since Oct. 27, when protesters set fires to vehicles on the bridge. Traffic can access the camp from the south on Highway 1806.

In a statement late Monday, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe Chairman Dave Archambault II said if the governor is truly concerned about safety, the state should clear the blockade on Highway 1806.

State officials have said the bridge can’t reopen until it’s safe for the North Dakota Department of Transportation to do an inspection and make necessary repairs.

The governor’s order also states that state emergency services will not be made available to the protest camp. The order applies to the protest camp that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has not permitted and announced will be closed to the public on Dec. 5.

However, neither the state nor the Corps has said that protesters would be forcibly removed from the camp.

Related Topics: DAKOTA ACCESS PIPELINE
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