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Dakota Spotlight bonus content: Robert Lawrence police video

Exclusive photos, documents and videos from "The House on Sweet and Seventh," the third season of Dakota Spotlight, just for members.

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Once captured by police, Brian Erickstad was found to have several cuts on his arms and hands
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In this members-only bonus segment: A video of Robert Lawrence in custody, previously unpublished photos and a police document.

Video

Robert Lawrence and Brian Erickstad were arrested in Grand Prairie, Texas, five days after the murders of Erickstad's parents, Barbara and Gordon in Bismarck, N.D.

While the suspects' friends had been concerned about not 'narcing' or telling on each other, Robert Lawrence didn't waste much time telling the police that Brian killed his parents.

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Previously unpublished photos

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Once captured by police, Brian Erickstad was found to have several cuts on his arms and hands

Original Police Document

Three weeks after the homicides, Brian Erickstad's girlfriend, Aimee Werner, and five others were arrested for breaking into the Erickstad couple's house on Laredo drive, the scene of the murders.

Forced Entry on Laredo Drive by inforumdocs on Scribd

James Wolner is a Digital Content Producer at Forum Communications Company, Fargo North Dakota and the creator, producer and host of Dakota Spotlight, a true crime podcast. He has lived the Upper Midwest since 2013 and studied photojournalism at California State University at Fresno. He is fluent in English and Swedish.
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