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Dakota Spotlight bonus video: police interview with Misty Jones, Rick Storhaug

Exclusive photos, documents and videos from "The House on Sweet and Seventh," the third season of Dakota Spotlight.

Dakota Spotlight: Misty Jones Rick Storhaug
Misty Jones and Rick Storhaug, interviewed at Bismarck Police Department, 1998
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If you have not yet listened to Season three of Dakota Spotlight Podcast you can do so by starting with episode one: Listen Now.

Two Bonus Videos

1. Rick Storhaug

While investigating the murders of Gordon and Barbara Erickstad, the Bismarck Police Department interviewed Rick Storhaug more than once. In this short segment, Rick Storhaug's mother describes how she was woken up by the sounds of a car and footsteps outside her home on the night of the homicides.

2. Misty Jones

When Misty Jones was interviewed on the afternoon of Sept. 18, 1998, Bismarck police had yet to locate the bodies of the victims. In this segment, Detective Steve Lundin convinces Misty to share more information.

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RELATED Podcast homepage | Season 3 videos | Season 2: 1976 Zick murders | jwolner@forumcomm.com

James Wolner is a Digital Content Producer at Forum Communications Company, Fargo North Dakota and the creator, producer and host of Dakota Spotlight, a true crime podcast. He has lived the Upper Midwest since 2013 and studied photojournalism at California State University at Fresno. He is fluent in English and Swedish.
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