We see that you have javascript disabled. Please enable javascript and refresh the page to continue reading local news. If you feel you have received this message in error, please contact the customer support team at 1-833-248-7801.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Water elevation at Jamestown, Pipestem reservoirs decreasing

Releases at Jamestown Reservoir will stay at 800 cfs. Releases at Pipestem will remain at 600 cfs.

Pipestem Reservoir high water file 50720
The Pipestem Reservoir had high water levels as seen in early May 2020. The water elevation was at 1,476 feet above mean sea level then. The water elevation at Pipestem Reservoir on Monday, July 18, is at 1,470 feet AMSL.
John M. Steiner / The Jamestown Sun file photo
We are part of The Trust Project.

JAMESTOWN – The water elevation at Jamestown and Pipestem reservoirs is decreasing from the highest points earlier this year, but the combined releases at both locations will stay at 1,400 cubic feet per second, according to Bob Martin, interim Pipestem Dam manager for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

The water levels at Jamestown Reservoir on Monday, July 18, are down 4 1/2 feet from the highest point this year – 1,442.5 feet above mean sea level – to 1,438 feet AMSL. Jamestown Reservoir’s conservation pool is at 1,431 feet AMSL.

The water levels at Pipestem Reservoir have dropped 8 feet from the highest point this year – 1,478 feet AMSL – to 1,470 feet AMSL. Pipestem Reservoir’s conservation pool is at 1,442.5 feet AMSL.

MORE STORIES RELATED TO FLOODING:

Releases at Jamestown Reservoir will stay at 800 cfs. Releases at Pipestem will remain at 600 cfs.

“They will at least stay at this level unless we start getting rain or something like that or we don’t get any rain,” Martin said. “Pipestem with 28 feet still to go they (Corps of Engineers) aren’t going to reduce flows unless something out of the ordinary happens.”

Masaki Ova joined The Jamestown Sun in August 2021 as a reporter. He grew up on a farm near Pingree, N.D. He majored in communications at the University of Jamestown, N.D.
What to read next
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers awarded a $131.5 million contract for the construction of the Pipestem Dam safety modification project.
The city of Jamestown will save $60,000 on the purchase since it was done before Thursday, Sept. 29.
Planning a project in advance is a key to avoiding supply-chain issues and getting materials on time.
It could cost more money to trim trees if they are not regularly pruned.