ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Find out what being a victim of financial fraud or a scam could do to your blood pressure

When a scammer calls about your car's warranty or overdue taxes that must be paid immediately or you'll be hauled off to jail, do you get mad, scared or irritated? In this episode of NewsMD's "Health Fusion," Viv Williams checks out a new study that explores what being a victim of financial scams and fraud can do to your blood pressure.

Blood pressure measuring equipment ready for use
Regular blood pressure checks are important for heart health
Photo by thinkstock.com
We are part of The Trust Project.

ROCHESTER — Financial schemes and scams may cause your blood pressure to rise. A new study from Rush University Medical Center in Chicago found that fraud victimization was linked to elevated blood pressure in men, but not in women.

The researchers followed 1,200 older adults annually for 11 years. They asked the participants about fraud victimization and they measured their blood pressure regularly. Results showed that after experiencing a financial fraud or scam, men's blood pressure reading went up. Over time, hikes in blood pressure could lead to health problems.

“These findings show that fraud victimization has important public health consequences and underscore the need for efforts to prevent exploitation,” said lead author Dr. Melissa Lamar.

High blood pressure (hypertension) increases your risk of diseases, such as heart attack and stroke.

The study is published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics society.

ADVERTISEMENT

For more stories about high blood pressure, check out the links below.

A quick power nap can boost energy and help you feel refreshed. But a new study links frequent napping to high blood pressure. In this episode of NewsMD's "Health Fusion," Viv Williams shares that it's likely not be the naps themselves that are the issue, but rather the health and nighttime sleep patterns of the people who take them.
Smoking and high blood pressure can go hand-in-hand. Even if you're on medication to lower it. In this episode of NewsMD's "Health Fusion," Viv Williams explores a new study about how smoking may make high blood pressure harder to control.

Health_Fusion-1400x1400.jpg

Follow the  Health Fusion podcast on  Apple,   Spotify and  Google podcasts. For comments or other podcast episode ideas, email Viv Williams at  vwilliams@newsmd.com. Or on Twitter/Instagram/FB @vivwilliamstv.

MORE HEALTH FUSION:
Ticks can survive a Minnesota winter, but their go time is March through October. In this episode of NewsMD's "Health Fusion," Viv Williams goes in-depth with a tick expert who helped discover two pathogens that ticks can carry. And both of them can make you sick.

What to read next
For decades, the drug industry has yelled bloody murder each time Congress considered a regulatory measure that threatened its profits. But the hyperbole reached a new pitch in recent weeks as the Senate moved to adopt modest drug pricing negotiation measures in the Inflation Reduction Act.
Sanford Health’s Program for Addiction Recovery provided Tanner Lene a way to connect to a heritage he’d left largely unexplored, as he began to learn Ojibwe and join classes taught by elders and knowledge keepers on traditional medicines and art.
"Minding Our Elders" columnist Carol Bradley Bursack says distance makes keeping track of your parents' health harder, but barring dementia, they get to choose where they live.
When you sprain your ankle or have an infection inflammation helps to heal tissues. But when inflammation is chronic, or long term, it can contribute to conditions such as heart disease and autoimmune diseases. Researchers have found a link between chronic inflammation and low levels of vitamin D. Viv Williams has details in this episode of NewsMD's "Health Fusion."