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Health Fusion: Get stress under control or you won't be able to go the distance

Stress seems to have reached new heights in our society and everybody experiences it. But if you don't reign it in, on-going stress can sap your energy, ruin quality of life and erode your health. In this episode of NewsMD's "Health Fusion," Viv Williams talks to a Mayo Clinic expert about the consequences of too much stress and he offers tips to help you decompress and improve wellbeing.

My guest is Dr. Edward Creagan, a Mayo Clinic oncologist, speaker and author. He says stress is a serious problem.

"Whether you're a butcher, a baker or a candlestick maker, you've got to get stress levels under control," says Creagan. "Otherwise you won't be able to go the distance. Our lives depend on our basic wellness and stress has the potential to erode our physical and mental health."

Watch or listen to learn more about stress and ways to handle it. Plus Dr. Creagan and I will share some stories of mishaps that we attribute to too much stress in our lives. Some will make you smile, but others demonstrate just how bad stress can be.

Edward T. Creagan, MD, FAAHPM, is Professor Emeritus at Mayo Clinic Medical School and the author of two award-winning books: "Farewell: Vital End-of-Life Questions with Candid Answers" and "How Not to Be My Patient." He blogs at www.AskDoctorEd.com .

Follow the Health Fusion podcast on Apple , Spotify , and Google Podcasts.

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For comments or other podcast episode ideas, email Viv Williams at vwilliams@newsmd.com . Or on Twitter/Instagram/FB @vivwilliamstv.

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