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Stutsman County coronavirus cases at zero

For the first time in about 15 months, there are no active coronavirus cases in Stutsman County.

Covid vaccine
A medical professional draws a dose of the coronavirus vaccine into a syringe back in February 2021. John M. Steiner / The Sun

For the first time since April 18, 2020, the North Dakota Department of Health Coronavirus Dashboard shows zero active cases of COVID-19 in Stutsman County on Monday, July 12.

The number of active cases in Stutsman County peaked at 529 on Nov. 17. According to the North Dakota Department of Health, 3,467 people in Stutsman County have recovered from COVID-19 and 82 people died of the disease.

The number of cases has been 10 or fewer since May 29 and may have actually dipped to zero briefly in the past two weeks, according to Robin Iszler, unit administrator for Central Valley Health District.

"We had some positives last week," she said, referring to some positive tests reported on the day the Stutsman County active case count initially dipped to zero. "They must be out of quarantine now."

Public testing is continuing in Stutsman County.

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"Now, we are testing less than 20 a day at the public site," Iszler said. "We will continue to test as long as it is needed."

Central Valley Health offers public coronavirus testing from 11 a.m. to noon on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays at the Jamestown Civic Center. The testing is scheduled for every week with the exception of July 27 through July 29.

Iszler said the testing results do not include any information about any possible variants, although she suspects the delta variant is in North Dakota and the surrounding states.

Vaccination has been the key to reducing the number of active cases, she said.

"About 99% of cases of people contracting COVID-19 are not vaccinated," Iszler said. "It is not too late to get vaccinated."

Currently, about 53% of the population of Stutsman County has been vaccinated, with higher percentages of elderly people vaccinated.

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