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RED RIVER

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Ryan Richard built a new farmstead when the original plan for the Fargo-Moorhead Flood Diversion threatened his original farmstead. But the route of the revised diversion project now runs through his new farmstead, a setback he said will cost him millions of dollars.
Heavy rains prompted Valley City to adjust for a Sheyenne River crest that was four feet higher than first expected.
That's just one of the studies on tap in the Red River Basin. Here's a rundown.
Despite the rapid snow melt, topsoil has been able to absorb some of the liquid, resulting in moderate flood conditions in the Red River Valley.

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The Red River has a 90% chance of reaching 30.7 feet and a 5% risk of 39 feet in Fargo, where major flooding starts at 30 feet.
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The route follows the historic trek of Eric Sevareid and Walter Port that was documented in a novel titled “Canoeing with the Cree."
The Red River in Fargo now has a 90% chance of a 30.3-foot level and a 5% risk of 38.5 feet. Major flooding in Fargo begins at 30 feet.
The latest spring flood outlook issued by the National Weather Service predicts moderate to low-end major flood risk in the Red River Valley.
Fall rains and snowfall as of midwinter have eased the drought and produced conditions expected to result in minor to moderate flooding in the Red River Valley.
Efforts to re-establish lake sturgeon in the Red River Basin began in 1997 and 1998, when the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources stocked juvenile sturgeon into the Red River and several tributaries, using fish from the Rainy River.

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"We believe the risk to park users is too high," the petition's organizer said in an interview. "It's just downright unacceptable."
The dismissal of the lawsuit immediately opens the way for the Central North Dakota Water Project, but also will be helpful later in establishing the legal authority to use federal infrastructure to divert Missouri River water to the Red River.
Work continues on a project to bring water from the Missouri River to eastern North Dakota. This summer's drought doesn't have anything to do with the timing, but it shows the importance of it, one project leader says.

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