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RED RIVER VALLEY

The Red River Valley Water Supply Project will sue farmland owners for eminent domain if they don’t sign easements before July 8, 2022. Farmers say the project is paying one-tenth what others pay for far smaller oil, gas and water pipelines.
The North Dakota Attorney General’s office is asking Red River Trust, a Washington-based entity with offices in the Kansas City, Kansas, area, and an address at Grafton, North Dakota, to prove that it doesn’t violate anti-corporate farming laws, which would require it to sell land it purchased from owners of Campbell Farms of Grafton.
"Minding Our Elders" columnist Carol Bradley Bursack says the cafes provide socialization, understanding and more for people living with memory loss and their loved ones.
A warmup is coming in June, but conflicting forces make it impossible to predict whether the summer will be hot and dry or hot and wet.

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The Red River has a 90% chance of reaching 30.7 feet and a 5% risk of 39 feet in Fargo, where major flooding starts at 30 feet.
This winter season, the Valley has already weathered 6 blizzard warnings. Average winters see three or four.
Fall rains and winter snows allowed some areas of the Red River Valley to escape drought, while others remain abnormally dry or in drought.
Fall rains and snowfall as of midwinter have eased the drought and produced conditions expected to result in minor to moderate flooding in the Red River Valley.
Painter Dan Jones displays both sides of the Red River Valley in his first solo show at the Rourke Art Museum + Gallery in Moorhead.
A La Niña weather pattern can produce a colder, snowier winter on the Northern Plains and Upper Midwest, but sometimes is overridden by other weather systems. This winter likely will be colder and snowier than last year's mild, dry winter, forecasters say.

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Sugarbeet harvest plays a large role in the Red River Valley's agriculture industry. Due to the harvest being non-stop once the campaign begins, many local businesses extend their hours in an effort to rally behind sugarbeet producers.
“The timing of the rain was too late to make a difference for our earliest soybeans, but it did help many of our later fields fill pods better,” according to one farmer in Valley City, North Dakota.
Sugarbeet harvest in the Red River Valley is an around the clock operation, requiring a multitude of seasonal workers to get the job done.

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