columnist Rob Port

Rob Port

Columnist

Rob Port was a pioneer in political blogging in North Dakota, founding SayAnythingBlog.com in 2003. Since then he's worked in talk radio and published print columns as well. Currently he publishes digital and print columns for the Forum News Service, and also hosts the Plain Talk podcast.

Before beginning his writing career, he spent 10 years working as a private investigator specializing in insurance fraud, accessing public records, and criminal defense.

He speaks English.

"It's going to be painful, but Republicans can't just turn away from Trump. Republicans have to lead their people away from Trumpism and the morass of conspiracy-addled grievance and unvarnished racism it has become," Rob Port writes.
The greatest cost of this scandal to our state isn't measured in dollars so much as lost trust in our public servants.
Sen. David Hogue and Rep. Mike Lefor, the newly elected majority leaders of North Dakota's Senate and House chambers, respectively, joined this episode of Plain Talk to discuss the upcoming legislative session.
Democrats have embraced early voting, to their benefit. Republicans, following Trump's lead, have not, and it's hurting them.
If we're lucky, Trump's sway over the GOP will fade away, allowing the party to return to its status as the far more dignified opponent of Democratic rule in the future.
Data from this month's midterm election vote show the delegates showing up for the North Dakota Republican Party's candidate selection process are significantly out of touch with what North Dakota voters want from those candidates.
Supporters of independent candidates Rick Becker and Cara Mund, who both lost their races by landslide margins on election day, are clinging to the idea that these two are rising stars in North Dakota politics. The vote totals say otherwise.
"At this point, opposition seems more about obstinance than principle," Rob Port writes.
On this episode of Plain Talk, Armstrong argued that, despite Republicans not living up to "red wave" expectations, they've gained ground in the legislative chamber he serves in for three straight election cycles.
"It's not enough for Trump to go. Trumpism, which is to say the bombastic, hateful, egotistical, divisive, and ultimately self-defeating approach to politics Trump has popularized, and that many Republicans have internalized, must go with it."