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NDGF park at State Fair a place to learn, relax and play

In this episode of North Dakota Outdoors, host Mike Anderson talks with outreach biologist Greg Gullickson about the facility that has been a State Fair mainstay for nearly 30 years.

NDGF Fishpond.jpg
A teenager brings in a fish from the North Dakota Game and Fish Department's pond at the state fairgrounds.
Contributed / North Dakota Game and Fish Department
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MINOT, N.D. — The North Dakota State Fair opens Friday, July 22 and the Game and Fish Department's conservation and outdoors skills park is in the center of it all.

In this episode of North Dakota Outdoors, host Mike Anderson talks with outreach biologist Greg Gullickson about the facility that has been a State Fair mainstay for nearly 30 years.

The park offers a shady, grassy area to beat the summer heat, as well as several family-friendly activities, such as a fishing pond, archery and pellet gun ranges and various exhibits showcasing the state's outdoor life. Plus, its also a good opportunity for the public, Gullickson says, to visit with NDGF staff.

"There's been some positive things that have came from public comments that we've gotten at the fair that have been implemented in what we do as a game and fish department," he says.

MORE NEWS RELATING TO ND GAME & FISH:
The PLOTS Guide, which features information on walk-in tracts, also includes public land hunting access information, including more than 200 wildlife management areas totaling about 220,000 acres.

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The North Dakota Game and Fish Department's conservation and outdoor skills park has been a mainstay at the state fairgrounds for decades.
Contributed / North Dakota Game and Fish Department

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