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POLICY

Listening sessions are underway for a new farm bill. What needs to be there and what doesn't?
The U.S. Department of Agriculture on Wednesday, July 20, 2022, changed the formula for disaster payments for above-normal livestock losses to reflect truer values of baby calves and other animals, in the wake of the April 2022 “Blizzard Haley” storm complex that hit North Dakota. The previous administration had administratively in 2020 added a "bottom-tier" of payment for baby calves that undervalued the animals.
Former North Dakota Agriculture Commissioner Sarah Vogel, an attorney, advocate and author, said she thinks North Dakota Attorney General Drew Wrigley or lawyers in his department should have acquired a copy of a trust for the benefit of billionaire Bill Gates, and lease-back agreements with Campbell Farms of Grafton, North Dakota, before “deeming” the deal legal.
Iowa-based Summit Carbon Solutions says its $4.5 billion pipeline project will help ethanol plants lower their carbon score. The project aims to capture greenhouse gas emissions and pipe the CO2 to western North Dakota for underground storage. But a lawyer is trying to keep Summit off the land owned by his clients.

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The Midwest Agriculture Summit was held in Fargo where attendees listened to policy makers speak on current agriculture issues and challenges.
The Red River Valley Water Supply Project will sue farmland owners for eminent domain if they don’t sign easements before July 8, 2022. Farmers say the project is paying one-tenth what others pay for far smaller oil, gas and water pipelines.
A series of April blizzards created a “long tail” of cattle illnesses, including pneumonia and scours. Losses range from zero to hundreds of calves, on top of record-setting drought and low feed and forage supplies. The numbers hide some of the effects — the loss in value when either a calf or a cow is lost, leaving orphans. 
Small meat processors were thrust into the spotlight early in the COVID pandemic and now are benefitting from grants and programs to help them expand. Jenniges Meat Processing in Brooten, Minnesota, is a prime example.
The decision means carbon pipeline companies must file for a siting permit with the Minnesota Public Utilities Commission. Without statewide authority, permitting would have been left up to individual counties along the pipeline route.
In January, the Environmental Protection Agency announced it was restricting the use of a herbicide in six Minnesota counties out of concern for an endangered species, a species it chose not to make public. Before the calendar could flip to April, EPA had reversed those restrictions as well as even wider herbicide bans because of an insect called the American burying beetle. So what was behind the initial secretiveness? Why the sudden reversal?

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U.S. Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., and John Thune, S.D., are moving a bill in the Senate, designed to pressure international ocean freight companies to fill freight “containers” with agricultural products instead of sending them back to Asia empty. Rick Brandenburger, president of Richland Innovative Food Crops Inc., Inc., of Breckenridge, Minnesota, says the company is getting only one-third of their needed containers. They want “teeth” in any efforts to fix the problem.
The Environmental Protection agency says it relies on information from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, but information from that agency and other snake experts seem to contradict what EPA says.
The Environmental Protection Agency, not the North Dakota Agriculture Department, is responsible for disposal of stocks of unusable chlorpyrifos products, Doug Goehring, North Dakota Department of Agriculture Commissioner said.

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