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SOYBEANS

Randy Martinson, of Martinson Ag in Fargo, projects economic markets are looking up for farmers after a severe drought in 2021.
JAMESTOWN, N.D. — Green Bison Soy Processing plans to start bidding on 2023 soybeans by the third or fourth quarter of 2022 and processing by fall 2023.
The free workshops will cover topics for the successful operation of diesel equipment.
The workshops begin in late November.

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Latest Headlines
Yields across the states hit by drought all saw upward revisions relative to September.
“The timing of the rain was too late to make a difference for our earliest soybeans, but it did help many of our later fields fill pods better,” according to one farmer in Valley City, North Dakota.
Officials haven't released the name of the company building the plant, but say it could create 60 new jobs with an average pay of $32 per hour.
SB&B, a Casselton, North Dakota, agricultural export business which produces, processes and markets non-GMO soybeans, for a year has been sitting on more product than is typical because of a transportation backlog that’s resulted from the coronavirus pandemic. They are among the ag export companies being crippled by the lack of available ocean ships to move U.S. farm products to global markets. Ag exporters are enlisting the help of the federal governments and trade group to try to breakup that backlog
A small organic farm family near Le Sueur, Minnesota, and a larger, non-GMO farmer near Kasson, Minnesota, are among those hit hard by the Pipeline Foods bankruptcy, which sent shockwaves through the region’s organic markets. The company is asking the courts to let them sell inventory grain to pay off the secured creditors, not the farmers who deliver it. The case leaves farmers wondering whether the state does enough to protect farmers and verify the financial soundness of grain traders.
Each grower can test up to three fields with the pre-marked soil testing bags.

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University of Minnesota Extension specialists spent the day on July 8 demonstrating trials at its plot in Rochester.
Farmers in the southern Red River Valley who experienced drought conditions a month ago, along with 50 mph winds, now have gotten a shot of rain. Soils that moved also moved weed seed, which can contaminate neighboring fields with tough-to-control waterhemp. A return to hot, dry conditions makes those weeds even harder to control.
NDSU research and Extension specialists will be on hand to discuss current crop issues and answer questions from producers and other visitors.

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