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DAIRY

Famo Feeds Inc., of Freeport, Minnesota, is an unusual livestock feed maker for Minnesota because an independent, family-owned manufacturer has its own brand of feed. The company’s colorful logo is a curiosity for the thousands of motorists and customers traveling along Interstate 94, en route to and from the Twin Cities.
Patrons attending Dr. Dawn's Dairy Day program participated in all kinds of fun events.
Quaal Dairy in Otter Tail County sold off most of its herd in April. Vernon Quaal says the 2021 drought drastically cut into its feed supply and the rising prices for feed made maintaining the 300 cow herd unstainable. Quaal says many dairies are suffering. But he is determined to build back up, with a crop of bred heifers ready to calve in September.
The bus will go to Cows & Co. Creamery and Dairy Farm

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Zweber Family Farms of Elko, Minnesota, and Buck Dairy Farm of Goodhue, Minnesota, have been with Organic Valley since the start of a boom for the entire organic industry.
Mike and Joan Gilles, who milk about 110 cows and have 100 acres of open ground for pasture grass with another 150 acres of land they rent for growing forages, hosted a pasture walk on June 15 sponsored by the Sustainable Farming Association and the Dairy Grazing Apprenticeship.
Visitors greet a young Holstein calf.
A recap of the fluid (drinking) milk history of the U.S., even as dairy product consumption and production rise. Focuses on the demise of delivery trucks like the one that John and Sharon Larson of Moorhead, Minn., in companion story.
Car collector John Larson and his wife, Sharon, of Moorhead, Minn., are new owners of 1939 International dairy delivery truck they acquired in 2017. The truck was likely used for delivering in Duluth, Minn. It is decorated with logos from Arkulary's Grocery of Duluth, Minn., a family that was important in the city's retail food business.
Stephen Arkulary of Duluth, Minn., describes how his family grocery business changed from western Wisconsin in 1936, to Duluth in the 1950s, until it was forced out due to wholesaler competition in the 2000s. He advertised his last business with the truck that John Larson owns as a collector.

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“You’ve got South Dakota now, who wasn’t even in the top 20 dairy states in the country, and now we’ve become one of the hottest spots," South Dakota dairy producer Lynn Boadwine said.
Two college students will serve as North Dakota dairy industry advocates.
The growing popularity of plant-based milk has reduced sales of traditional cow's milk, although not to a major degree, a new U.S. Department of Agriculture report concludes.

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