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POLITICAL NEWSLETTER

Legislative expense reports show Sen. Ray Holmberg of Grand Forks spent more than $125,000 on travel over the last decade, far exceeding the average for lawmakers.
A Pew study found that North Dakota's rainy day fund would keep state government going for 115 days, but a legislative leader cautions that state budgets must last for 730 days.
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Dean Bresciani wraps up his presidency at North Dakota State University in Fargo on May 16, nearly a year after his contract was not renewed.
The guide is designed to help voters decide how they would like to fill out their ballot prior to doing their official voting.

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"Each petition that has been submitted over my 29 years in office has received the same careful review of each signature," Jaeger said in a letter dated Thursday, May 12. "...The claims made in your letter do not change my decision that the petitions are still considered to be insufficient as to the number of signatures required for placement on the November General Election ballot."
The group behind a proposed ballot measure to legalize recreational marijuana in North Dakota has raised more than $500,000 to support its effort. Most of the campaign funds come from pro-pot organizations located in Washington, D.C.
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Officers who searched Holmberg's condo in Grand Forks also investigated a child porn suspect who exchanged texts with the state senator.
Three candidates are running to replace longtime Secretary of State Al Jaeger, while recently appointed Attorney General Drew Wrigley is looking to keep his office against Democratic challenger Tim Lamb.
Gov. Doug Burgum told state agency heads on Thursday to base their 2023-25 budget requests on the appropriations lawmakers approved for the current budget cycle. In previous years, Burgum asked agencies to find potential cuts in their budget requests amid harsher economic conditions.
The eight-member board oversees the North Dakota University System, which includes the University of North Dakota and North Dakota State University.

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The North Dakota Legislature passed a "trigger" law in 2007 that would ban abortion within 30 days if the Supreme Court ever changed direction on the controversial procedure. There are exceptions to the law if the mother's life is in danger and in cases of rape or incest.
Minnesota could become an island for abortion access in the Midwest if the U.S. Supreme Court overturns Roe v. Wade.
The claim applies to the historical bed of the Missouri River — the river as it was before construction of Garrison Dam created Lake Sakakawea in the 1950s — not “the entirety of the bed of Lake Sakakawea,” the statement said.

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